First | Prev Page 1 / 3 | Next | Last

Time-Tested Tactics to Build Your Wealth

We have doled out a lot of good advice over the 70 years we’ve been publishing Kiplinger's Personal Finance magazine. So in many ways it was easy to come up with 70 ideas on how to create wealth. But when our editorial staff submitted nearly 300 ideas, the editors had to roll up our collective sleeves and distill the advice into absolute gems.
Read more →

What Can a Dollar Buy? Depends on Where You Live

You know that $25,000 car you've had your eye on? In just 10 years, it could cost almost $34,000, assuming prices rise by a mere 3% per year. That's the reality of inflation, which is commonly understood as the increase in the price of any product or service.
Read more →

Identity Theft and Taxes

Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in America affecting millions of unsuspecting individuals each year. A dishonest person who has your Social Security number can use it to obtain tax and other financial and personal information about you.
Read more →

Income Inequality and Its Impact on Women's Retirement

Here are the facts. Generally speaking, women earn less than men, live longer than men, and often take time out of the workforce to have children and/or to care for an aging parent or sick loved one. The potential consequence of these realities? While most U.S. workers are facing a retirement savings deficit, for women, the effect is compounded: Lower pay translates into reduced Social Security benefits, smaller pensions, and less retirement savings.
Read more →

Own a Retirement Account? Keep Your Beneficiary Designations Up to Date

Many investors have taken advantage of pretax contributions to their company's employer-sponsored retirement plan and/or make annual contributions to an IRA. If you participate in a qualified plan program you may be overlooking an important housekeeping issue: beneficiary designations.
Read more →

Will Debt Hinder Your Retirement Outlook?

The number of Americans in or nearing retirement who are still holding significant mortgage, auto, even student loan debt has been rising in recent years. According to recent data released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the average 65-year-old borrower has 47% more mortgage debt and 29% more auto debt than 65-year-olds had in 2003, after adjusting for inflation.1
Read more →

Turning the Page: five Things Baby Boomers Need to Know About RMDs

The times they are a changin' for baby boomers. The generation that lived through and influenced the revolution in the retirement industry is now poised to begin withdrawing money from their retirement-saving vehicles -- namely IRAs and/or employer-sponsored retirement plans.
Read more →

The Charitable IRA Transfer: Permanent at Last

In December 2015, President Obama signed into law the "Protecting Americans From Tax Hikes Act of 2015." This new ruling made permanent many tax breaks that had been dubbed "extenders" as taxpayers would have to wait -- typically until the last minute -- for lawmakers to reinstate them for another year. Among the most popular of the bunch is the IRA charitable transfer provision. So if you are age 70½ or older and charitably minded to boot, consider tapping your IRA.
Read more →

Get in the Habit -- Smart Investing Habits to Adopt This Year

Some of your New Year's resolutions may be to break a few of your bad habits and to take on some new, positive habits. If you'd like to improve your investing habits, setting up daily, monthly, and yearly routines may help.
Read more →

Three Year-end Tax Reduction Tips

Even though April 15 now seems a distant deadline for filing your 2015 tax returns, in order to take advantage of some of the biggest tax reduction strategies, you have to act before the end of this year. Without further ado, here are three "go-to" maneuvers that you may want to execute by December 31.
Read more →


First | Prev Page 1 / 3 | Next | Last